Appalachian Trail Expands into Europe

Appalachian Trail Expands into Europe

A large ambitious project to create a European, long-distance walking route to mirror the impressive Appalachian Trail in the US is gathering momentum.

The International Appalachian Trail (IAT) plans to establish a network of walking trails to link all the geographic regions once connected by the Appalachian Mountain range, which was formed more than 250 million years ago on the continent Pangea, which straddled what is today eastern North America, eastern Greenland, western Europe, and north-west Africa.

Appalachian Trail
The International Appalachian Trail aims to create a network of routes down the side of the Atlantic coast, reflecting the 2,500-mile Appalachian Trail in the US.

The IAT has forged bonds between trail managers in the US, Canada, Greenland and Iceland, and on this side of the Atlantic between Ireland, Wales, Scotland, Sweden, Norway, France, Spain and Portugal. It aims to create a network of routes down the side of the Atlantic coast as far as Morocco, reflecting the 2,500-mile Appalachian Trail in the US.

IAT trail markers now appear on the Ulster Way and Antrim Hills Way in Northern Ireland, Glyndŵr’s Way National Trail, Wales Coast Path and Offa’s Dyke Path in Wales and Scotland’s Mull of Galloway Trail.

For more information, see iat-sia.org.

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Written by Jenny Nickelson

Jenny Nickelson has been a sports enthusiast since childhood. Because of her deep love to water, she started training swimming in early years. Today she swears on variety and does it all: from swimming, running and cycling to fitness, skiing, dancing and mountaineering.

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