High Intake of Diary Increases Risk of Prostate Cancer

High Intake of Diary Increases Risk of Prostate Cancer

An analysis that combined the findings of 32 studies showed that high intake of dairy foods increased the risk of prostate cancer by 3-9%. However, calcium supplements didn’t increase the risk.

Non-fat as well as whole milk increased the risk of prostate cancer to the same extent, so some component of milk other than calcium or fat may trigger the cancer.

In 2015 more than 30,000 men died in the United States because of prostate cancer, making it the second most common cause of cancer-related death. Prostate cancer is said to be the cause of death in 3 out of 100 men, yet 50% of men over 50 and 75% of men over 85 suffer from the the disease.

Obesity and smoking increase the risk of dying from the disease, while regular exercise works protective. A UK study showed that nearly 89,000 cases of cancer could be prevented through eating healthy foods and maintaining a healthy weight. Fast walking for three hours a week decreases the risk of prostate cancer progression by 57%. Also, eating cruciferous vegetables such as Brussels sprouts, broccoli and cauliflower decreases the progression of the disease.

A healthy lifestyle consisting of a balanced diet, regular exercise and weight control is the best way to prevent the deadly form of prostate cancer.

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Written by Jenny Nickelson

Jenny Nickelson has been a sports enthusiast since childhood. Because of her deep love to water, she started training swimming in early years. Today she swears on variety and does it all: from swimming, running and cycling to fitness, skiing, dancing and mountaineering.

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